Interactive display in media center offers anonymous help

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School librarians have put up an interactive display in the media center, according to media manager Shanna Mooney, to help students and staff with issues that are bothering them.

Media manager Shanna Mooney adjusts signs on the display wall. The interactive display allows students to anonymously receive help from book bundles that the media center assembles. JOYCE LAM / PHOTO

Media manager Shanna Mooney adjusts signs on the display wall. The interactive display allows students to anonymously receive help from book bundles that the media center assembles. JOYCE LAM / PHOTO

The display allows students and staff who seek aid to anonymously post their problems onto a bulletin board located in the reading room of the  media center. Participants are required to list what they are experiencing on a piece of paper and to post it onto the display. Then, participants may stop by the reading room later on to pick up a book bundle, consisting of a fiction and non-fiction book, relating to the particular subject that they are experiencing.

“I want people to find the answers to any question they have and to know that they’re not alone, and to find answers in what they read,” Mooney said.

According to Terry Ramos, media and communications department chair, the new display gives students an opportunity to get help for those who are not comfortable to disclose information about their issue to others.

“We try to give students a temporary escapism from what they’re dealing with, and some insight concerning their problem through works of fiction that we’ve included in the book bundle. This is so that they can have access to that information in a way that is not intrusive to others,” Ramos said.

Counselors and databases are available to students that may be undergoing certain issues, however the  media center’s new display remains an alternative for students and staff to approach the situation.

“I think it’s a really good idea because it’s an anonymous way to come out to your problems without feeling insecure about them,” freshman Baylie Owen said.

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