Cadaver dissections to occur on Nov. 25 at Indiana Spine Group

Guest speaker Gina Londino addresses club members while Club Med sponsor Sarah Gillim listens. Londino talked about forensic science, including the process by which bodies decay and how bullets impact the surface of a body. AARON SHI / PHOTO

Guest speaker Gina Londino addresses club members while Club Med sponsor Sarah Gillim listens. Londino talked about forensic science, including the process by which bodies decay and how bullets impact the surface of a body. AARON SHI / PHOTO

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Guest speaker Gina Londino addresses club members while Club Med sponsor Sarah Gillim listens. Londino talked about forensic science, including the process by which bodies decay and how bullets impact the surface of a body. AARON SHI / PHOTO
Guest speaker Gina Londino addresses club members while Club Med sponsor Sarah Gillim listens. Londino talked about forensic science, including the process by which bodies decay and how bullets impact the surface of a body. AARON SHI / PHOTO

On Nov. 25 at 3:30 p.m., Club Med members will visit the Indiana Spine Group (ISG) to attend a cadaver dissection, located within the Medical Academic Center. According to Omeed Malek, Club Med co-president and senior, students must provide their own transportation. There will not be a club meeting that day.

During the cadaver dissection, a chief surgeon will give instructions to club members about the cadaver, according to Malek. Following the speaking session, students will be free to analyze the cadaver on their own. Malek said he is excited to observe a human being from a medical perspective.

“If students can’t treat live humans yet, then deceased humans are the next best thing,” Malek said.

According to Malek, the dissections will aid students seeking a career involved with medicine.

“(The dissections) give a worldly understanding of what the medical field actually entails,” Malek said. “Real human bodies have real ailments, and I think that familiarizing students with human bodies on an anatomical and physiological level this early on in their education benefits them tremendously in the future at medical school.”

Club Med sponsor Sarah Gillim said she agreed.

“There’s nothing like seeing real humans and dissections,” Gillim said. “There’s the emotional impact associated with the dissections, which doesn’t necessarily mean they’re not cut out for it, but just means that they need to adjust.”

Malek said, ultimately, the dissections provide learning in a setting other than a classroom.

“It’s helpful for students to see the real thing,” Malek said. “Real people aren’t the models that you see in anatomy books with their heads turned to the side, palms facing forward and feet facing out.”

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