CHS should save green spaces, hold memories, experiences for students

CHS+should+save+green+spaces%2C+hold+memories%2C+experiences+for+students

Edward Dong

As a senior, when I first heard that CHS decided to eliminate senior parking up the trail, my reaction was like that of others: disappointment that a privilege promised to us for years had been completely stripped away.

However, while there’s much room for debate over why administration really should have allowed at least some parking for seniors instead of leaving nearly the entire lot empty during the school day, what students should really disagree with is the school’s ongoing plan and reasoning for closing the lot. 

Their goal is to expand the main building by paving over green spaces farther down the trail with new parking lots—especially the one currently across from Murray Stadium, one of the last remaining open spaces adjacent to the school.

Why is this such a big deal? These green spaces are fundamental to our high school experience. As a member of the cross-country team, we use that grassy field across from Murray almost daily during practice. On the days we don’t, I see a diverse array of clubs there nearly every day, from the flag football club to the unified teams. 

Even something as small as playing ultimate frisbee with my friends on that field during finals week is a warm memory for me. If I may get a little sentimental, these are our last blissful years of adolescence, which should be spent making memories on green landscapes and fields by the school, not barren parking lots.

Compared to most other schools, CHS already has a significant shortage of green space, especially considering our large student body. Now, the district proposes to eliminate what little we have. Where will our 300-member cross country team go when the grassy field is filled with cars? Where will we be able to make those high school memories playing Frisbee? How will students destress and enjoy their precious after-school time when their school is filled with soulless concrete?

Our district is nearly done growing and is predicted to shrink by 2026. Expanding doesn’t make sense. With such little greenery left on campus, any expansion should be done cautiously. The district should instead look inward and improve the spaces we already have.

At the end of the day, as much as I’d like to say that administration cares about students and our activities, the students are ultimately the ones that utilize this greenery to unwind, and need to be the ones that advocate for them. 

We can’t always rely on the district to make the best choice for us, and this particular choice is irreversible; there is no room for mistakes. After that grassy field across from Murray is paved over, it’s gone for good.

The views in this column do not necessarily reflect the views of the HiLite staff. Reach Edward Dong at [email protected]

To read an article about new changes CHS is making to the building, read this article from Current In Carmel.

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