Q&A with Brandon Anderson, co-president of African History and Culture Awareness Club

Brandon+Anderson+%28top+right%29%2C+African+History+and+Culture+Awareness+Club+co-president+and+sophomore%2C+speaks+at+the+racial+equity+meeting+with+Dr.+Harmas.+This+meeting+occurred+on+Sept.+24+and+was+organized+by+the+Black+Student+Alliance+in+order+to+discuss+racism+at+Carmel+High+School+and+future+steps.+

Chenyao Liu

Brandon Anderson (top right), African History and Culture Awareness Club co-president and sophomore, speaks at the racial equity meeting with Dr. Harmas. This meeting occurred on Sept. 24 and was organized by the Black Student Alliance in order to discuss racism at Carmel High School and future steps.

Tsion Daniel

Brandon Anderson, co-president of African History and Culture Awareness Club and sophomore

How would you describe the African History and Culture Awareness Club?

“It is a club dedicated to filling in all the gaps left in history classes by our school system. The gaps around the history of Africa and black people in the world in general.”

What does a typical meeting consist of?

“Well, throughout most of the year, we’ll have someone start off by talking about some historical aspect of black history, and then we’ll move on to talking about a cultural thing or participating in a cultural thing. And in February, we get to head the whole Black History Month (program). So our meetings consist of us making posters and figuring out who we would talk about on the announcements, that sort of thing.”

Why would you encourage people to join the African History and Culture Awareness Club?

“I think that it’s very important for all kids to know that the history of Africa doesn’t begin with slavery (and) that there is a lot of culture that is on that continent that we should spend more time looking at.”

In light of the current increased awareness regarding racial issues, what has African History and Culture Awareness Club done in response?

“You know, really making sure that we get to have these meetings in the face of some leadership challenges.”

Is there anything I have not asked you that you would like readers to know?

So much about what people think they know and understand about Africa is very wrong and the African Studies class does a good job of fixing these false beliefs. So I encourage you, if you are in 10th grade or above, to sign up to take the African Studies class next year!”

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