End of Course Assessment testing to take place from Dec. 10 to 14

Brad Sever, End of Course Assessment (ECA) coordinator and assistant principal, works on ECA spreadsheets. Sever said that his goal is to have the majority of the testing done on Dec. 10 and 11 so the remaining days can be reserved for students who have to make up the test. DENNIS YANG / PHOTO

Brad Sever, End of Course Assessment (ECA) coordinator and assistant principal, works on ECA spreadsheets. Sever said that his goal is to have the majority of the testing done on Dec. 10 and 11 so the remaining days can be reserved for students who have to make up the test. DENNIS YANG / PHOTO

Beats

While the ECA is typically taken at the end of the year, from Dec. 10 to 14, students who have moved to this school from out of state or who have failed to pass the End of Course Assessment (ECA) for Algebra I and/or English 10 will take the ECA for their respective courses, according to counseling department chairperson Linda Skafish.

Indiana’s Graduation Qualifying Exams for Algebra I and English 10 were originally ISTEP tests but were replaced with the ECA a few years ago. Thus, to qualify for graduation, not only do students have to complete their course requirements, but they also must pass these two ECAs, Skafish said.

“We want students to take it seriously because we know that it’s a high-stakes exam for them,” Skafish said. “They have to pass it to be able to get a diploma.”

Brad Sever, End of Course Assessment (ECA) coordinator and assistant principal, works on ECA spreadsheets. Sever said that his goal is to have the majority of the testing done on Dec. 10 and 11 so the remaining days can be reserved for students who have to make up the test. DENNIS YANG / PHOTO

However, Skafish said students who haven’t taken the exam before and are in a higher level math class should perform well on the ECA without a lot of preparation, “although it might be worth their while to read through the review packet just because some of the topics that are covered on the test are not necessarily included in upper level math classes.”

Brad Sever, ECA coordinator for CHS and assistant principal, said he agrees with Skafish.

“I don’t think (students who have moved in from out of state and have excelled in math and English) should be worried it; I think they should be prepared, but I don’t think they should be worried about it,” Sever said.

Sophomore Summer Slavin, who moved to CHS from Atlanta this year and is currently enrolled in the second semester of Algebra I, said she feels optimistic about taking the exam this winter.

Slavin said she doesn’t plan on doing a “particularly large amount” of studying. “I’ll probably go over a few things, but I don’t plan on staying for hours,” Slavin said.

Sever said 85 percent of students who have finished the respective courses have finished the exam in the past. This is because, Sever said, “our teachers do a tremendous job of preparing students for (the ECA).”

However, Sever said readiness is still a key to performing well.

“I think that sometimes, it’s easy to forget to (eat well, be timely, and sleep well). I think those things are really important and I hope that students don’t underestimate those things that seem pretty commonsense.”

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