Contradictory Convictions: The debate over DACA should open eyes for CHS students about discrimination, immigration issues in the U.S.

Contradictory Convictions: The debate over DACA should open eyes for CHS  students about discrimination, immigration issues in the U.S.

Bethlehem Daniel, Reporter

As the child of immigrants and as someone who has experienced marginalization, I have witnessed firsthand how easy it is for people to categorize large groups into seemingly simple, homogeneous groups. We find this phenomenon everywhere in our daily lives. However, when we break these marginalizations for certain groups of people, unforeseen implications ensure.
The Obama-era policy formally known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) has been a point of contention within our government for months. As polarized politicians bicker about the merits of similar programs following DACA’s halt by President Donald Trump, Americans have lost some of the humanity that sets us apart from others.
According to a 2018 poll conducted by National Public Radio, only 65 percent of Americans support citizenship for childhood arrivals. Our nation, the hallmark of equality and a melting pot of cultures, has, within the context of this issue, showcased another side of the issue — there’s a large portion of the populous that doesn’t support this ideal.
Looking at the issue from an objective manner, it is hard to pinpoint a specific reason for the lack of clear popular support for DACA. Is it the legality of their arrival to the United States as a young child, a situation they had no control over? Is it the polarization of the issue and how it has penetrated into our daily lives in a general manner? Is race a part of the equation? Whatever the answer may be, the solution is easy — a change of heart.
Although the latter statement might seem somewhat cliche, it is honestly a solution — if embraced wholly by Americans — that would ensure the nation is able to stick to its roots as a nation of immigrants and a land of opportunity for all. Although it may be difficult to sway those who have discriminatory beliefs entrenched into their minds for decades, it is imperative to realize characterizing a person based on their skin color or any other affiliation is erroneous, outdated and outright prejudice.
Thus, I urge you to be an advocate for change, educate those around you, fight for equality for all and don’t fear to disagree with institutional practices that encourage discriminatory action — change is on the horizon.

2