School board to meet on April 12, schools to continue hybrid learning for remainder of school year

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School board president Layla Spanenberg meets on March 22 at a board meeting. Board members discussed policy changes, new school courses and COVID-19 effects on academics.

Wendy Zhu

The school board will meet on April 12 at 7 p.m. in the Educational Services Center for its next board workshop meeting. Board members met on March 22 to discuss topics like modifications to certain policies to ensure consistency with student handbooks and new courses in schools across the district. Additionally, Dr. Amy Dudley, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment, presented on the effects of COVID-19 on student achievement.

Earlier this month, the school district shared information about a potential full-time reopening of CHS, as well as the district’s middle schools. On March 17, however, Superintendent Michael Beresford released a statement about the district’s plans to remain hybrid for the remainder of the school year. According to school board president Layla Spanenberg, even though in-person learning is often more effective than virtual learning, the school board’s number one priority is still maintaining student safety. Though the school district considered full-time reopening, there was never a plan for reopening set in place.

“For starters, there was no plan,” Spanenberg said. “All Dr. Beresford was saying is that because we have had a consistent downward tick in COVID positive cases and quarantines at our schools, we would take this opportunity to evaluate if we could bring everybody back full time… It was determined that it is not possible.”

Junior Jinhee Won said she was happy with the plan going forward and the continuation of hybrid learning.

Won said, “I think I understand why they considered it, but the difficulties in figuring out the logistics and the problems it would have in the classrooms and in the hallways clearly pose too much of a risk, so I’m glad the school decided not to fully reopen.”

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