• THE CLASS OF 2024 SENIOR ISSUE IS OUT NOW: PICK UP A PRINT COPY NOW OUTSIDE C127!
  • HILITE NEWS HAS BEEN NAMED A NATIONAL SCHOLASTIC PRESS ASSOCIATION ONLINE PACEMAKER FINALIST
  • HILITE NEWS HAS BEEN NAMED THE HOOSIER STAR WINNER FOR NEWS SITE
  • HILITE NEWS HAS BEEN NAMED A COLUMBIA SCHOLASTIC PRESS ASSOCIATION GOLD CROWN WINNER
Your source for CHS news

HiLite

Your source for CHS news

HiLite

Your source for CHS news

HiLite

Club Spotlight: Korean American Student Association (KASA)

Gina Kong, club president and sophomore

Why did you found KASA?

I thought that KASA was going to be a very interesting and unique idea that we could introduce to our entire school and it was not a club that we had already. It shows a lot about Korean culture and as K-pop has become more and more popular, we have begun to see a greater interest in Korean culture as well. 

How do you think this helps Korean students? 

As a Korean student myself, I would say that it helps us because it helps us find each other and get together. Our school is very diverse and mixed races and having a lot of other Koreans together and talking to each other is a really good opportunity for us.

What are the goals of the club?

Overall for this club, I want everybody of all races and all the people in our school to learn more about Korean culture and learn about what it means to be a Korean. This can be through the celebrations, the holidays we celebrate and a lot of other aspects of our culture.

When do you guys meet?

We meet once a month, every first Wednesday.

What does a usual meeting look like?

(At) each meeting we have different activities planned. At our last meeting, we had an introduction to the entire club and taught students how to write their names. At our next meeting, we will be introducing some more cultural aspects of Korean culture. We just want to plan activities that we think everyone will enjoy. 

Is KASA benefiting the students of CHS?

Yes, absolutely, because a lot of students are able to take advantage of this new opportunity and open themselves up to learning Korean Culture. 

 

Korean American Student Association (KASA) members play yut nori, a traditional Korean game played during the Lunar New Year. Gina Kong, club president and sophomore, said, “I thought that KASA was going to be a very interesting and unique idea that we could introduce to our entire school…It shows a lot about Korean culture, and as K-pop has become more and more popular, we have begun to see a greater interest in Korean Culture as well.” (Abigail Lee)

 

Natalie Bellotti, club sponsor

Why did you decide to sponsor KASA?

It was something that I did not plan to do; however, I had two students approach me and tell me what the purpose of the club was. I thought it was very interesting and inspiring and I felt like it was something I definitely wanted to be involved in.

What is the purpose of the club?

The purpose of the club is not only to embrace different experiences and cultures but also to have fun. Every time we have met so far we have done a fun activity that everyone enjoyed. (The student leaders) explain it well, talk about what culture is being represented and how it relates to Korean culture.

How has it benefited CHS?

So far I have been very excited about the amount of people who have come to attend. This club is a great time for people to connect and make friendships. A school this large can be incredibly overwhelming when it comes to getting to know people and making friends. Having a club that is open to everyone is just a great way to make the school feel a little smaller.

How can people get involved?

We meet once a month, and they are in Room E243. People can just come, pay dues, and sign up to be on the roster, but after that it’s open to everyone.

What is your favorite part about it?

I did Tae Kwon Do for nine years. I actually had the opportunity to travel to South Korea with a competition team. From there, I just fell in love with South Korean culture and everything about it. Even though this club isn’t directly related to a martial art, it’s just still embracing culture and art. Every single meeting so far I’ve learned something new.   

Leave a Comment
Donate to HiLite
$20
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All HiLite Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *